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Throw an Exception Easily (Error)

Basically, we want to be able to control if we want an error. At this time Flow does not let you easily throw an error.

There is a Terminate action which is awesome, I use it in every Flow or Logic App I create.
The Terminate Action will terminate the Run immediately. Terminate will not allow other actions to execute, even if the ‘Configure Run After’ is set to Failed, Skipped.

This can be a headache trying to implement a way to easily Fail an action. While allowing the Flow to continue running the ‘Configure Run After’.

Setup

We will use a Try – Catch method. Basically we will use ‘Scope’ actions to house different parts of our actions. You can think of ‘Scopes’ like a way to organize your Flow.
Add them into your Flow just like any other Action.

Try – Where your original flow design will be placed.
Catch – This is where we ‘Catch’ – Meaning we will only run this Scope if the above Scope has a Failed Action

First add a ‘Initialize variable‘, define the type as Boolean, and call this variable Exception.
Next add two(2) ‘Scopes’

Next we want to only run the Catch Scope, if the Try scope has failed.
To do this, simply click the Three(3) dots on the Action and click ‘Configure run after’

Now deselect ‘is successful’ and select the ‘has failed’, and ‘has skipped’ checkbox. Click Done

Next, to trigger an error in the Try Scope, add a ‘Set Variable‘, and select the Boolean from above.

Now, inside the value use the expression null.

The Set Variable should look like this now:

Since our Catch block will run if Try fails, our run will show as Successful. We can change this by adding a ‘Terminate’ action

Add any other error handling you wish inside the Catch scope, some examples include:

  • Email to Support that Flow has failed
  • Different type of business processing
    • Delete a record
    • Rename a record
  • Service Bus – dead lettering

TIP: When adding other actions inside the Catch scope make sure to make the Terminate action last

Here is a Test run:

Conclusion

This is a great method for executing an error, Its fast and simple, and can be used many times in the same Flow.
Thanks for reading!


Featured

Bypass Apply to each Loop

Have you ever noticed that Power Automate will sneak in that ‘Apply to each loop’ even though you are only expecting a single value.
For example this can happen whenever you are using a Action that ‘Lists’ items, folders, fields, etc.
In this example I will be showing how to get a User ID in CDS with the users Full Name.

Have you ever noticed that Power Automate will sneak in that ‘Apply to each loop’ even though you are only expecting a single value.
For example this can happen whenever you are using a Action that ‘Lists’ items, folders, fields, etc.
In this example I will be showing how to get a User ID in CDS with the users Full Name.

The Problem

Power Automate creates a ‘Apply to each’ loop when selecting dynamic content from a action that Lists items, folder, or anything. In most cases this is awesome and creates a nice smooth workflow.

However, what about when you know exactly what you want to look for and you know its only going to be 1 record, item, whatever is going to be returned. Power Automate will still make you use the ‘Apply to each’ loop.

This may not be a such a terrible thing, but if you need to do multiple things underneath that action, you will have to put them in the loop as well (if you need any data or reference to that action)

The Solution

On to the magic..
In my example Flow I will be using:

  • ‘Compose’ action to have my Full Name stored.
  • ‘List records’ CDS action to list records from the default Users table entity.
    ** Note – This can be done with any connector. **
  • ODATA filter on the ‘List records’ which I am using to filter ‘fullname’
  • Under the ‘List records’ I use a ‘Compose’ action to store the users ID(Primary Key from CDS) and the users Email Address

Step 1 – I am using CDS List records for my example, with a Odata filter

My List Records with my Odata filter
My List Records with my Odata filter

Step 2 – Adding Compose action to use the Expression to bypass the loop

Add a Compose action below the List action. And select Expression

Type anything, this is to keep us in Expression mode when we switch back to Dynamic Content tab

If you see the fx Logo in the Dynamic Content Tab, you have done this correctly

Remove what you had, and Click the Value of the action you want to bypass the loop with

Remove the ? and add [0] This is saying we want the first record only. Since this returns an array we say 0 as this is the first record in an array

after the [0] we type what the field name is, in this format: [‘feildname’]

Click OK.. I usually like to put the Expression in a Comment

This is the exact expression I used in my Compose action

body('List_records')['value'][0]['systemuserid']

DONE!


Limitations:

The only thing you have to watch out for is when there is a empty record. This will cause an error if the record is empty.
This can easily be fixed using a Condition If block before the Compose to check if value is empty using the empty() expression.
OR
If you want to avoid the error altogether, you can use the expression first() instead of body()

I hope anyone finds this useful. This boosts performance greatly when you only need one record since you wont need a Apply to each loop.

Thank you for reading

Power Automate Substring and Text Positions Made Easy

Expressions can be confusing when starting out in Power Automate. Luckily the product team makes things easier each day. I will be showing how to grab an email address Josh.Cook@flowaltdelete.ca and transforming it to Josh Cook

Expressions can be confusing when starting out in Power Automate. Luckily the product team makes things easier each day. I will be showing how to grab an email address Josh.Cook@flowaltdelete.ca and transforming it to Josh Cook

The Scenario

For this demo, we will be formatting an email address and removing everything after the ‘@‘ symbol, to form a first name and last name.

We will be using Substring to achieve this. However we wont be using the expression Substring, we will be using a Action called Substring, this action can be found in the ‘Text Functions‘ connector.

The Flow

In my Flow I will use a Compose action to store an email address, this can be any data source or action that fits your needs.

In this example, we want to remove the At sign and everything after. To do this we could use an expression. But.. The Power Automate team has put together some actions that make Text Functions more easy.

At this time there is Two(2) Text Function action we can utilize.
1. Find text position
2. Substring
We will you both in this example

First we will add the ‘Find text position‘ action. This action has Two(2) parameters to fill in:
Text – The text we want to use, in this case we use the dynamic content of our Compose with the email
Search text – This is the text we want to find the position of

In the string Josh.Cook@flowaltdelete.ca the ‘@’ sign is in position 9. This is because in indexing values we count the first value as index 0

Next we add the ‘Substring‘ action. This action has three(3) parameters.
1. Text – The string of text to extract the substring from
2. Starting position – since we want to extract ‘Josh.Cook‘ our position will be 0
3. Length – This is how long the substring will be, so this is where we use the dynamic value from Text Position action (Which is 9)

Now when we run the Flow, we should take the value:
Josh.Cook@flowaltdelete.ca‘ And output ‘Josh.Cook

Mhm.. Not bad, now all that is needed is getting rid of the ‘.’ This can easily be done by using the replace() expression.
replace(<Dynamic Substring Body>,’.’,’ ‘)
The replace expression is replacing the ‘.’ with a white space char

replace(outputs('Substring')?['body'],'.',' ')

Now when we run the flow:

Conclusion

These new Text Function actions in Power Automate makes expressions even easier. I cannot wait to see what the Product group adds to these.
Thanks for reading, and as always please reach out to me on Twitter with any questions you may have. Thanks again!

Power Automate – Format Phone Number Easy

Take a phone number like 4031234567 and turn it to (403)-123-4567 with one simple step!

Take a phone number like 4031234567 and turn it to (403)-123-4567 with one simple step!

Scenario

We have a phone number coming in from a secondary system as a integer number. We than want to add some formatting to this to be easily read and look cleaner. For example, a phone number comes in like this:
4035557890 And make it look like (403)-555-7890

Things to Know

Since we add ‘-‘ and ‘( )’ this turns our data type to become an String. Keep this in mind, since you wont be able to pass this into a field in another system that is looking for a Integer value

The Flow

This Flow is very simple. To achieve the formatted number I am using the action ‘Format number’. This is a fairly new connector that is mainly used to format currency values. But we can utilize the format to define any formatting we want

Looking at the above picture, we are passing a Integer phone number into the Format number action. Than we specify the format we want to use by selecting the drop down > clicking ‘Enter custom value

End Result!

Conclusion

Since this action is fairly new, I am curious and looking forward to see if the Power Automate team will expand and add more actions like this to make formatting a breeze.

Thanks for reading!

Power Automate – Excel Dynamic Filename

In the Excel connector we are forced to use the file picker (folder icon) to select a Excel file. But what if we did not know the filename, or we are expecting NEW Excel files.. We will need a dynamic filename.

In the Excel connector we are forced to use the file picker (folder icon) to select a Excel file. But what if we did not know the filename, or we are expecting NEW Excel files.. We will need a dynamic filename.

I have learnt this method from John Liu. I have pointed so many people, and community users to John’s blog when they run into this Excel connector limitation. I have found multiple people thinking its too complicated, or confusing, because the method works with Graph API to get the File ID.
So this blog will be a very easy guide to follow and hopefully will be able to get your Flow being able to use a dynamic filename. If you have any questions or problems with this guide or other Power Automate related questions, reach out to me on Twitter.

Things to Know

To make this even easier, we will be having the Excel file that be stored into a SharePoint Document Library. We can also use the SharePoint HTTP call action to better build our REST call more easily.
* We will still need the Excel file to have a table defined *

Getting Started

First we will create a new SharePoint Document Library for the files, or use an existing document library.

Next, we want to have one Excel file in the Library to start, so we can make sure this is working. Here is what mine looks like:

My example, I have a Document Library called ‘Excel Files’ with a Excel file to start with

Overview of The Flow

For the Flow, I am using the SharePoint action ‘Send an HTTP request to SharePoint‘. This action uses MS Graph in the background, but makes it a lot easier to construct a API call.
First we will use a simple call to SharePoint using the ‘Send an HTTP request to SharePoint‘ action to get all the Document Libraries for our site.
Than use the output of that action to find the Document Library Drive ID.
This is how we navigate through the SharePoint site, we want to do this until we are in the folder of our Excel File.

Lets Build that Flow

First we add ‘Send an HTTP request to SharePoint‘ action

Uses Graph API in the back-end

In the SharePoint HTTP action, use the following:
– Site Address: If your SharePoint site does not show up in the drop down, click use ‘Enter custom value’ and type the homepage of your site
– Method: GET
– Uri: _api/v2.0/drives/
– Headers: accept application/json

Now trigger the Flow to get the Output of the HTTP request.

You can also read and get what you need through the Output Body window

I am using Visual Studio Code to paste the Output into, its free, and easy to use.
If you have lots of Document Libraries, you may want to use a Find feature and search for the Document Library name. For this demo I will be searching Excel Files.
We need to look for a specific ‘id’ inside the output

Copy this id,we can use this value to navigate inside that Document Library in our HTTP request. Our new URI should looks something like:
_api/v2.0/drives/b!MJxrwkJ2FUGanaxoijg0eZmnU9iP4aJJsidrZJQNlsBAb-8VLzYJRbD9CKmJa0j8

Now we need to add /root:/ to the end of our URI

We are almost complete! We now need to specify the path to our file. Here are some examples:

If file is directly in the Document Library(No Folders) – Just add the filename with the extension
_api/v2.0/drives/b!MJxrwkJ2FUGanaxoijg0eZmnU9iP4aJJsidrZJQNlsBAb-8VLzYJRbD9CKmJa0j8/root:/MyNewExcelFile.xlsx

If file is in a folder – Add the folder name, than the Excel file with the extension
* NOTE: If folder name has spaces, than use %20 instead of a space *
Folder name = Historical Files
_api/v2.0/drives/b!MJxrwkJ2FUGanaxoijg0eZmnU9iP4aJJsidrZJQNlsBAb-8VLzYJRbD9CKmJa0j8/root:/Historical%20Files/MyOldExcelFile.xlsx

Mine is not in a folder so I will be using the first one. Now to make the file dynamic, I will be using a Compose action to store the Filename. So in my HTTP Request I will be using my Compose action with the Filename and extension at the end. My example will look like this:

The Filename, can come from any Dynamic content, I am just using a Compose for the sake of this Demo

Now test the Flow to validate the HTTP request is valid. The output should have some references to the file, like the name of the file, size, created date time, and last modified date time. My output looks like this:

Next, to get the file ID, we use a Compose action with an expression.
Add a Compose action, inside the Compose we will use the HTTP request Body dynamic content in a expression:

With the fx logo present on the dynamic content tab. Click the Dynamic content Body. Now we use JSON path to grab the file ID.
This is done by adding a ?['id'] to the end of the expression. My expression looks like this:

body(‘Send_an_HTTP_request_to_SharePoint’)?[‘id’]

body('Send_an_HTTP_request_to_SharePoint')?['id']
You can copy my expression, just make sure to change the Send_an_HTTP_request_to_SharePoint to your HTTP request action name

Next add an Excel Get tables action. Use the outputs from the Compose – get file ID for the File

Now add an Excel List rows present in table action.
File: Use the outputs from Compose – get file ID action (same as we did for Get Tables)
Table: Click Enter custom value. Use this expression to get the first table name
first(body('Get_tables')?['value'])?['id']
** Same as before. Get_tables is my action name **

first(body(‘Get_tables’)?[‘value’])[‘id’]

Success!!

Now, sometimes the Dynamic content of the Excel columns wont be there now. You can easily grab any column you like using the item() expression. For example I have a column named Tasks so my expression will be
item()?['Tasks']

item() can only be used inside an Apply to each

Conclusion

Being able to use a Dynamic filename in the Excel connector can be tricky. But I am hoping with this guide, anyone who needs this business requirement can easily follow this, and get it done.

Again I wanted to give a shout out to John Liu. I originally learnt this method from his blog, which can be found here:
http://johnliu.net/blog/2019/5/workarounds-needed-to-use-the-excel-connector-in-microsoft-flow

Thanks for reading. If you have any questions or problems with this guide or other Power Automate related questions, reach out to me on Twitter.

Grab Azure Key Vault Secrets Securely

Using Azure Key Vault to pass in secrets into Flow for secure transportation of sensitive information

How are you using and storing sensitive usernames and passwords in Flow? We use usernames and passwords for so many different actions in Flow. One main use is in a HTTP action.

In scenarios like this, where do you store these usernames and passwords? This post will show how to use Azure Key Vault action to get a secret, which can be passed to any action securely using Secure Inputs and Outputs.

Prerequisites

  • Azure Subscription
  • Azure Key Vault setup
  • Key Vault Secret created
  • Premium License for Power Automate

Steps

Okay, now that we have the above prerequisites ready, lets get the Flow created

First we want to search for ‘Azure Key Vault‘ when adding a new action in our Flow. We will use the ‘Get Secret‘ action

When creating the connection, you will be asked for the Key Vault name. This is the display name that is in Azure.

Next, we add the name of the Secret we want to get. I also Initialize a variable to store the Secret in for easier reference later in my Flow

Inside the Variable, I select the Dynamic content Value.

Now, I run the Flow…

Oh Uh, that doesn’t look good.. Our Secret is wide open and visible in the run history. We can easily fix this.

On the Get secret action we want to enable Secure Outputs
We do this by:
Clicking the 3 dots on the Get Secret action,
Go into settings,
Enable Secure Outputs.
Click Done

Now when we run then Flow, the Secret value will be hidden from the run history, in all actions.

Thanks for reading!!
If you have any questions, please reach out.

Power Automate Expression Union – Return Unique Values

Power Automate Expressions – union
Using union to remove duplicates on two different collection arrays

This blog will be looking at an expression called union() This expression can be used to remove duplicates from 2 collections. In this example, I will be using an Excel file to demonstrate this. But this can be done with any data

The Scenario

I will be taking an Excel file that has many Paper Items.

We want to remove all the duplicate items from the Plastic Item column. Why would we want to do this?
One reason may be that we get this file from a 3rd party, but we only care about the unique items to import into another system (CRM, CDS/Dynamics, SharePoint, Etc.)

Steps

First we want to add an Initialize variable, Type = Array
Next, we need to get the data we want to use. In this example I am using List rows present in a table

Now we add a Apply to each loop, and use the dynamic content value from our Excel action
Inside the Loop we add a Append to array variable action, and add the column we want to remove duplicates from. In this example Paperitem

We are done inside the loop..

Outside the loop we add a Compose action, this is where we will put the expression union
In the Expression tab type union()
Select the dynamic content tab and pass the array variable to union twice
(Click your variable comma click variable again) Your expression should look something like this:

union(variables('paperItemArray'),variables('paperItemArray'))

Done!!

Final Thoughts

Now we have a Array of all unique Plastic Items, which can be imported into another system based on your needs.

Thanks for reading!


Power Automate Tips and Tricks for Beginners

In this post, I wanted to share some of the tips and tricks that I have learnt and came across. Some of these tips I will cover the basic fundamentals so you can start using them to help you build you Flows with less pain and more fun!

1. Compose

Compose actions, are one of my favorite actions to use. They are so robust and can display pretty much anything. Compose can be found under
Data Operation > Compose

1.1

Add a Compose action before a Condition to check what values are being evaluated. In this example, my condition is saying:
If length of value is greater than 0
I add a Compose action before the condition, with the same value I am using in the condition. This allows me to check the run and see the value being evaluated
Example:

1.2

If Flow is spitting out errors about a wrong data type or you keep getting unexpected values – Since Compose can hold just about any data type. We can add one and check what the value is in run history.

1.3

Compose actions are great for doing expressions – We can add a Compose action and do expressions in the input, instead of writing the expression directly inside another action. This is handy if you need to do multiple expressions, or error checking.

2. Meaningful Names

There is nothing worse than leaving the default names for all your actions. This can be confusing, which can cause errors which could have been avoidable.
This tip is going off tip #1.

2.1

The picture below shows a bunch of Compose actions
Left: Default names used – Makes it very hard to know which action is what
Right: Custom names used – Changing the names to something meaningful allows actions to be easily found and referenced.

2.2

For awhile now, Power Automate has had a limitation with renaming actions that were being referenced in other places. That has since changed. We can now rename action that are being referenced in other actions!
For example:
The left picture shows the Compose action named ‘Compose Project’ and is being referenced by the condition below.
Changing the Compose action name to ‘Project Name’ also changes the name in the referenced condition, which is shown in the right picture.

—–NOTE —–
Limitations still exist.. The reference will not be updated if the action is in a expression OR inside a Loop. And will throw an error of:
Template Validation Failed
.
So it is always best to rename actions right away
—————

2.3

When using Expressions, to better understand and show others what is going on. Comments are great for this. For example, if using a complex expression I like to copy the expression and put into a comment of that action:

3. Scopes

Scopes are handy, they can be used for grouping actions together. In this guide I will show how to use scopes to group actions together. There are many advanced techniques that scopes can be used for, but for this demo I will be showing the very basics. Scopes can be found under
Condition > Scope

I will add 2 scopes, one for Users, and one for Accounts
To add actions in the scope, Click and Drag the action into the scope

Drag the actions in so the order of the actions remain the same. For example, I put the Scope above the List Records action so I could drag the List records in first than the For each loop next

This concept will help us in the following tips

4. Parallel Branches

All Flows run from top to bottom in a single order fashion. If we split the actions to run side by side (parallel) This would drastically improve performance.
In this scenario I have Two(2) CDS List records, and Two(2) Apply to each loops

List Records – Users
Apply to each – To Append(add) all First names into a single variable
List Records – Accounts
Apply to each – To Append(add) all Account names to a single variable

Here is what the Flow looks like:

Running the Flow, we can see it takes about 4 minutes

Before we create a parallel branch we first must put the actions inside a Scope, this is to allow us to drag the actions around without getting the

This action cannot be dragged above actions it depends on. Error

Refer to Tip# 3 for details on Scopes

Now lets have these 2 different Scopes run in parallel branches
First we want to click the ‘+’ icon where we want to add the branch, next click Add parallel branch

In this example, I am adding a parallel branch above both Scopes

Our screen will look like this:

Next we need to Click and Drag one of the scopes to the new branch

Once the Scope is in the branch we can click the X on the Choose an action tab

NOTE: If you are adding a Parallel branch in the middle of a Flow, you might encounter a strange scenario where the new branch goes nowhere, or a dead-end. Please refer to my Blog on the Community forums to solve this:
https://powerusers.microsoft.com/t5/Power-Automate-Community-Blog/Adding-a-New-Parallel-Branch-Goes-Nowhere/ba-p/514676

Now lets run thew Flow again:
As the picture below shows, the Flow now only takes 2 minutes to run, cutting our run time by half, that’s insane!

Imagine our run normally taking 30 minutes, now only taking 15, just from a simple step

Tip# 5 will make our Flow run even faster!!

5. Concurrency

What is it? By default loops run one after another. Concurrency can make loops run in parallel.
To better understand this, we can think about a grocery store. In this scenario:

People = Value that is going into Apply to each loop
Lanes/Cashier = Concurrency Control Number


There are 20 people waiting in line at the store. There is 1 lane/cashier open. Since the cashier can only take one person at a time, this process can be lengthy.
Now with Concurrency turned on, things are a bit different. Lets say we set Concurrency to 5. This means 5 lanes/cashiers will be open. This is great! But there is a catch..

When Concurrency is enabled, there is no more line. All 20 people are processed randomly.

Concurrency can be applied to all Apply to each loops — As well as Triggers!

To enable Concurrency:

First, click the 3 dots on the Apply to each action
Next, click settings

Next, choose the value for Concurrency and click Done

For this Demo, I am setting Concurrency to 50. Please be aware of API limit calls and 429 errors. If you get these errors while flow is running. Decrease the Degree of Parallelism

Now lets see this in action!
I set Concurrency to 50 on both my Apply to each loops from the last Tip.
As a recap, the last time we ran the Flow, it took 2 minutes to run.

Results: About 5 seconds!

The Run time is about 5 Seconds. Since we used a Parallel branch the total run time is the longest duration of our Parallel branches

This drastically improves performance.

Conclusion / Key Take Notes

  1. Use a Compose action to check values and outputs, that you normally cannot see, Like in a If Condition
  2. Compose actions can store almost any data type. When in doubt.. Use a Compose
  3. When using expressions, try using them in a Compose, this can make troubleshooting much easier
  4. Always use meaningful names for all your actions. Doing this will save loads of time later on, when needing to use dynamic content
  5. Comment, comment, and more comments. All actions allow for comments. This will help support teams troubleshoot your Flow, as well as your future self, if you have to make any updates later on
  6. When using expressions, copy the expression and paste into the actions comments section.
  7. Use Scopes to group actions together.
  8. To speed up performance, use parallel branches to enable actions to run side by side
  9. Enable Concurrency control on Apply to each loops to drastically increase performance
  10. Remember enabling Concurrency control randomizes the order the loop iterations run in. So if you’re expecting a certain order processing to happen, do not enable

These are some of the tips and tricks I wish I knew sooner. I hope at least one of these tips and ticks have helped someone. Thanks for reading!

Adding Security Roles and Field Security Profiles to Users in CDS using Power Automate

The Scenario

We will be adding a Security Role / Field Security Profile to users in CDS. For this demo, our scenario will be grabbing all the users from a Office365 group and assigning them a certain Security Role / Field Security Profile.

The source of the users can be from anywhere:
– MS Form
– SharePoint
– Array inside the Flow
– Excel Table
– AAD Group / Office365 Group

Prerequisites

We will be using the Common Data Service Current Environment connector. This means that our Flow, MUST be created inside a Solution.

You will need appropriate permissions to be able to assign Security Roles and Profiles to

Steps

INFORMATION:
This Flow will work the exact same to add Field Security Profiles instead of Security Roles. The only changes you have to make are in the List records – Get Security Role, and the Relate records – Security Role to User. The changes are listed in the captions of those images.

We use a Variable to store the name of the Security Role we want to add to the users.
Than use a List records action on the Entity Security Roles
In our Filter Query we will use:
name eq ‘ ‘
Since we are using a variable to store the name of the Security Role, we pass this into the Filter Query

Field Security Profile = Change Entity name to Field Security Profile

Next, add a Compose action, to get the Odata URL. This URL is how we will add the Security Role to the User later on.

first(outputs('List_records_-_Get_Security_Role')?['body/value'])?['@odata.id']

To build the above expression follow these steps:

1) Inside the Compose action select Expression tab
2) Use the expression first()
3) Click back to Dynamic content tab

We use first() to get the first value in the CDS List records action. This allows us to bypass the Apply to each loop that Flow creates for us

4) In the ( ) select the Dynamic content value from the List records action

TIP: Make sure you see the fx logo in the text box, this indicates we are using an expression

5) At the end of the expression add:

?['@odata.id']

6) Click OK

7) Confirm the expression saved correctly by hovering your mouse over the expression

Next, use any data source / connector that meets your needs to get the emails of your users that you want to add – In this example I am using Office365 List group members

Add an Apply to each loop – So we can loop through each email and assign the Security Role

Inside the Apply to each loop, add a List records action on the Users entity
Filter Query = internalemailaddress eq ‘ ‘
Add your dynamic content that has the email address for the user to add inside the ‘ ‘

Next, add a Compose action – to store the User ID (Unique ID)
We use the same technique as mentioned above, using first() and the field name
Add this to the end of your expression

?['systemuserid']
systemuserid = the field name in CDS that stores the Unique value for each user. This value is used as a lookup guid. So we can relate the records to this guid

Still inside the Loop:
Add a Relate Records action.. This is one of the actions inside the Common Data Service Current Environment Connector.
Entity Name: Users
Item ID: The Compose – Get User ID Outputs
Relationship: Select ‘Security Role – systemuserroles_association’ from the drop-down
URL: The Compose – Security Role odata URL

Field Security Profile = Change Relationship Dropdown to — Field Security Profile – systemuserprofiles_association

Your action should look like this:

Conclusion

Adding Security roles or Field Security Profiles, can be a long and tedious process. You can add this Flow to a MS form and have users fill out what roles they need.

Thanks for reading!

Authentication on Microsoft Forms

Microsoft Forms is great for many use cases. However, with some use cases you may not want the whole organization to have access to this form.

Summary

In short, we want to setup a way to allow certain users to fill out a MS form.
How can we achieve this?
My Flow below will show how to take a list from SharePoint that has users emails, to only allow them to process the Form.

** Note – You do not have to use SharePoint, you can use any means necessary. **

Setup

First you will need to have a Microsoft Form created – Any MS Form will work

Next, we setup our List of ‘Authenticated’ Emails. Again in this demo I am using SharePoint
I created a simple SharePoint List with a single text field to store email addresses

Steps

In the Flow, we create as normal with a Microsoft Form Trigger and action to get the Details
Trigger – When a new response is submitted
Action – Get response details
Next add a Variable, we make the Type an Array
Under the Variable, add Get items action, and choose our Authenticated users list that we created above

Next, add an Apply to each loop. Select the value from the Get items action.
Inside the loop, add a Append to array variable, select the variable that we initialized above. Value = the column name that stores the email Address in our SharePoint List

** Note – Make sure the Initialize variable is type Array **

Outside the loop – Add a Condition
Select the Array on the left side – Contains – Responder on the right

— We use Contains to check if the User filling out the form is in this Array of emails —

If the user who is filling out the form does not belong to the ‘Authenticated’ list, we Send an Email letting the user know they are unauthorized to fill out this form.
Under the Send an email action, add a Terminate action with Status of Success, this is to ensure the flow stops running, while not throwing an unwanted Failed run

Here is what a User will see when they do not have access

Conclusion

I am sure there are a million ways to add your own intuitive Authentication methods.
I hope my method helps or inspires someone else!
Thanks for reading